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How Big Was the Titanic?

A view giving a sense of the size of the Titanic.

Above: This view gives a sense of the enormous size of the Titanic.

882 feet 9 inches - the length of the Titanic (269.1 metres).

92 feet 6 inches - the width ('beam') of the ship at the widest point (28.2 metres).

175 feet - Titanic's height measured from the top of the funnels to the keel, also referred to as the hull (53.3 metres).

104 feet - Titanic's height measured from the top of the bridge to the keel (31.2 metres).

9 - the number of decks.

How Much Did The Titanic Weigh?

46,328 tons - the weight of Titanic in gross register tons.

1,328 - the difference in tonnage between Titanic and her sister ship Olympic (resulting from the increased size of her deck houses and other external additions).

52,310 tons - Titanic's displacement, i.e. the amount of water that Titanic displaced when fully loaded.

34 feet 7 inches - the draught of Titanic; i.e. the vertical distance between the waterline and the bottom of Titanic's keel (10.4 metres).

92 x 114 feet - the dimensions (width x length) of the largest room on the ship, the first class dining saloon on deck D.

1,116 - the number of portholes (also called 'sidelights') in Titanic's hull.

419 - the combined number of windows in the hull and deckhouses.

The rudder of the sister ship Olympic, comparable to that used on Titanic, under construction at the Darlington Forge Company Limited.

Above: The rudder of the sister ship Olympic, comparable to that used on Titanic, under construction at the Darlington Forge Company Limited.

78 feet 8 inches - the height of Titanic's rudder (23.8 metres).

15 feet 3 inches - the length of the rudder at the widest part (4.5 metres).

100 tons - the weight of the rudder (it was so heavy that one of two steam-powered steering engines were needed to operate it).

17 feet - the span of the central propeller (5.2 metres).

23 feet 6 inches - the span of each of the two outer propellers (7 metres).

Boilers ready for installation in the Titanic. Note the size of the figure stood in the middle distance.

Above: Boilers ready for installation in the Titanic. Note the size of the figure stood in the middle distance.

More To Explore

Now that you have a sense of the size of Titanic, why not read even more facts about the ship, find out about the people who built her, or discover how big the iceberg was that sank Titanic.


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